Stopping Smoking Now Greatly Reduces Risks To Your Health

Take it from the Surgeon General, from a friend, a family member, your doctor…smoking cigarettes is not a good thing.  I have been a smoker since I was 18, other than an 18 month period were I was able to quit in my mid-20’s.

DSB smokes, and so does QoB.  Everyone else I know does not, and some of those do-not’s are vehemently opposed.  I personally smoke like a chimney.  And cough like a car that just won’t start.  I’m easily winded, and have a hard time completing daily tasks, because of being just that winded.

I am ready to break free from all of this.  I have been thinking about it for a very long time, and have tried to become more mindful of all of the negative things about cigarette smoking here as of late.  Something a blog friend said on a comment really struck me.

Marilyn wrote in comment to this post: “I’m still stuck on the idea of a cigarette AND a CPAP machine. It’s causing psychic dissonance. I used to smoke. Cancer cured me — of smoking. I still miss that cigarette in the morning, but I don’t miss the chemo. Just a thought. ”

It is just a thought, but it’s one I took under advisement.  There is much dissonance to my smoking.  First of all, I have asthma and use an inhaler.  And, as Marilyn pointed out, I have to use a CPAP machine to sleep at night.  Add those two things together, along with the fact that cancer runs heavily in my dad’s side of the family, and it is I wonder I ever smoked to begin with.

Of course, I get bronchitis every year, that won’t go away.  Have for the past three years anyway.  I get more than my usual share of colds and stuffy nose.  I have to go outside in freezing wind and rain or outside in 100+ degree weather to smoke, unless I’m at home or in my car.  My activities are extremely limited due to being short of breath.  I have a strong desire to get close to a healthy body weight, and I can’t do much exercising because of the difficulty breathing.

There is just so much more I want out of life.  I don’t want to be chained to always having to have a cigarette.  Not only are they nasty and cancer-provoking and socially unadvised, they cost a lot of money.  I figured out, if I quit smoking, I will have an extra $400 – $500 a month, and I can really use that money.  Case in point, I had to have my cigarettes this week so I barely bought any groceries, and now my dad is picking me up enough from the grocery store until I get my weekly check.  Terribly humiliating, and I never ever want to ask for money.  Mom had to give me extra gas money, too.  I financially can’t afford to smoke, haven’t been able to for a long time now, and it’s just now sinking in.

My dad went out and bought NRT aids (Nicotine Replacement Therapy) for me this evening.  Just because he wants to help and he knows it will help me quit.  Some people say to just do it cold-turkey, but I can’t handle that, and yes, I have tried.  The last time I successfully quit smoking (for 18 months), I used the patch and it really didn’t seem that hard.

I’m pretty sure it will be hard this time, seeing as DSB is a smoker and we live together, and also because I’m a much more stressed-out individual then I was when I last quit.  I’m ready for the challenge, though.  I just can’t keep doing this (smoking) and killing myself off slowly.  I want to be free to exercise and do things I need to do and get healthier.  I don’t want to become a cancer or heart disease statistic because of something I CHOSE to do to myself.

So tonight right before bed will be my last cigarette, and when I wake I’ll slap on a patch and put a lozenge in my mouth (because I was so advised by my doctor), and I’m hoping that this is a battle I will win.  Any support or kind words are appreciated.  😀

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15 thoughts on “Stopping Smoking Now Greatly Reduces Risks To Your Health

  1. It is not easy, but you can do it! The patch plus the mini lozenges helped me a lot. My mom and stepdad switched to ecigs which can be a good transition for some.
    Be kind to yourself and do the things you already know work for you. For me successfully quitting is always about distraction and treating my mind like a whiny toddler. Support and cheers for you!

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    • Thanks for the support, RFL. I am doing the patch and the lozenges, and hopefully that will get me there. I’m liking the idea of treating myself like a whiny toddler. 😀

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  2. The anti smoking pills (Chantix) you get from a doctor apparently work. I’ve heard this form many people, including my son. I found deep breathing (and subsequent coughing) helped. Keeping your hands busy helps too. I also (still) have asthma, inhalers, all of that. I don’t know if we ever stop WANTING cigarettes … but we can stop smoking them. My husband stopped drinking. My boss gave up coke AND cigarettes (double whammy). It is hard, but it isn’t beyond you. You can do it. You CAN do it. YOU can do it. You can DO it!!

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  3. I am using Vaping to quit the cigs, and so far I have cut my cigs down by HALF in just a few days. I will continue to lower the amount of nicotine in my vaping juice too. This is the best method I’ve tried yet. Good luck hon…we can do this!

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  4. If I encouraged you to quit smoking, all this blogging will have been worth it because I will have actually helped you do a good thing for yourself. Bonus: your hair won’t smell like an ashtray and your clothing doesn’t have little burn holes in it. And you really have some money in your wallet! Amazing how much money it costs to support a habit that’s so bad for you.

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  5. Good luck!! I really hope you work through it! My mum and dad smoked all the time when I was a kid then when I moved out for uni, mum found she has emphysema and they both quit. It runs in our family and has killed at least one person every generation so I really take care not to be in smoky places, especially since my parents did things like smoke in the car when I was in it etc.

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  6. I wish you the best of luck. It will be hard, but you can do it. Ask for all the help you need. My mom died of lung cancer, so I always am happy to hear about anyone quitting smoking.

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